Purposeful development

Begin with the end in mind.

Dr. Stephen Covey’s oft-quoted Habit #2, which I heard for the first time more than fifteen years ago, resonates with me today. I had the occasion to use it yesterday during a presentation.  I was presenting, along with a client, to a group of individuals involved in the development of projects for low- to moderate-income families as well as the homeless.  We made one thing very clear from the beginning:  What we are talking about today starts and end with a purpose.  This purpose is to house the homeless.

Purposeful development.

With public funds drying up and ever-increasing gains in regulation, all the players involved in the development of projects for those that are less fortunate find themselves bound to more paperwork and seemingly less reward.  Reward.  That’s an interesting term in this entire game of bricks & mortar, services, and dollars.  What is the ultimate reward?

Purposeful development.

The work is the reward.  Collectively, the continuum of care – and the continuum of development – must steadfastly strive to focus on the purpose, letting go of the notion that the purpose is the financial fruit of the programs and projects implemented. Now, there has to be financial reward to keep everyone satisfied during the process and so they may come back to the scene for the next project and the next.  That’s not what I speak of here.  The attitude is what I speak of today.  The approach to the work.  The driver.  The raison d’être.

Purposeful development.